Anne Romaine

Anne Romaine is probably not on your list of top American country singers of the 20th century, nor on your list of most prominent civil rights activists of the 1960’s and 70’s. But this feisty southern belle had a remarkable influence in both the realms of music and social activism.

To read more, click the link.

Billie Holiday

In the smoky dance halls of Greenwich Village’s Café Society, bodies swayed to the bluesy sounds of Billie Holiday, oblivious to the fact their movements mimicked those of thousands of lynched blacks.
“Strange Fruit,” which was first performed by the African American singer Billie Holiday in 1939, paints a portrait familiar to southerners in the first half of the 21st century. The song describes “a strange and bitter crop” with “bulging eyes and the twisted mouth,” an illustration of a then all-too-common sight.

To read more, click the link.

Harry Belafonte

Though everyone may not immediately recognize the name “Harry Belafonte,” almost everyone in America is familiar with Harry Belafonte’s most famous hit, “Day O,” also known as the “Banana Boat song,” with its classic lyrics, “Day O, Me say day o, Daylight come and me want go home.”

To read more, click the link.

Corridos

The Corrido, a traditional folk genre of music of Latin America, has become the medium of choice for protest songs surrounding the contemporary issue of immigration.  The fusion of folk style with the current controversial topic has created this dynamic and inspiring new style of song.

To read more, click the link.

Leave a Reply